Faculty Profiles

Charles E. BidwellCharles E. Bidwell

Professor Emeritus
B.A. University of Chicago, 1950
M.A. University of Chicago, 1953
Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1956

Office: Social Sciences 426
Phone: 773-702-0388
Email: cbidwell@uchicago.edu
CV: Curriculum Vita

Charles Bidwell is the William Claude Reavis Professor Emeritus.

Bidwell is especially interested in the structural analysis of change in formal organizations and in the social organization of education. He pursues these interests in research on school organization and instructional processes. He is also pursuing research on the adolescent and young adult life course

Journals

Bidwell is a past editor of AJS and Sociology of Education.

Research Interests

Sociology of Education

Selected Publications

"The Collegial Focus and Student Achievement: Consequences of High School Faculty Social Organization for Students . Achievement in Mathematics and Science,"Sociology of Education 74 (July, 2001):181-209. (With Jeffrey Yasumoto and Kazuaki Uekawa)

"School as Context and Construction: A Social Psychological Approach to the Study of Schooling." In Handbook of the Sociology of Education, ed. Maureen T. Hallinan. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum, 2000.

"The Collegial Focus: Teaching Fields, Colleague Relationships, and Instructional Practice in American High Schools." of Education 72 (1999): 301-325. (With Jeffrey Yasumoto)

Structuring in Organizations: Ecosystem Theory Evaluated. Greenwich CT and London, England: JAI Press, 1988. (With John D. Kasarda)

"The Collegial Focus and Student Achievement: Consequences of High School Faculty Social Organization for Students' Achievement in Mathematics and Science," Sociology of Education 74 (July, 2001):181-209. (With Jeffrey Yasumoto and Kazuaki Uekawa)

The Organization and its Ecosystem: A Theory of Structuring in Organizations. Greenwich, Conn. and London, England: JAI Press, 1985. (With John D. Kasarda)

"The School as a Formal Organization." In Handbook of Organizations, ed. James G. March. Chicago: Rand McNally, 1965.